A Guide To The Scottish Highlands For Tourists

Thursday, May 27th, 2010
The steep south face of Ben Nevis from Sgurr a...
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The Scottish Highlands is a term given to the mountainous areas of Scotland that are to the west and the north of the Highland Boundary Fault. This region is the perfect holiday destination for tourists looking for a relaxed holiday or an action packed adventure. The area features dramatically different landscapes, making it the habitat for various plant and animal species. The Scottish Highlands are especially steeped in culture and traditions that spring forth from its unique history.

The Highlands are particularly famous for their natural attractions and offer visitors a wide range of stunning views. Ben Nevis, the tallest peak in the British Isles is located in this area. From gorges to peculiar rocky features, ancient woodlands and even some beaches, the landscape of the Scottish Highlands has a little bit of everything. Visitors to this region are especially advised to visit the Corrieshalloch Gorge, the Falls of Glomach in Kintail and the curiously stacked rock feature known as the Old Man of Storr. To admire the beautiful forests and woodlands, one must visit Speyside which is home to the pinewood, or make a trip to Ardnamurchan which features a temperate rainforest.

The best time to visit this wonderful location is either in spring or early summer. During this season, tourists can indulge in various activities from hill-walking to golfing, fishing, cruising, orienteering, and water sports or even shooting. For tourists who would prefer a more leisurely holiday, the Highlands have excellent country house hotels and hideaways as well as a number of spas. (more…)

Let’s Talk Whisky!

Friday, May 14th, 2010

Since the beginnings of Scotch Whisky a long time has passed and it evolved into what could easily be named queen of beverages. It is the best selling alcoholic drink in the world and not without reason. Since the first mention of whisky in 1494 (oddly enough, found in notes of Inland Revenue), distillers had the time needed to perfect brewing procedures.

Scotch Whisky

One of the things that are not common knowledge is that whisky is actually colourless in the beginning. It only gains its rich colour after either seasoning in sherry casks or adding caramel, that is supposedly not influencing the taste. While tasting of whisky, its age and the cask it’s been brewed in. You can know an aged whisky by thin trickles slowly making their way down the sides of the glass. (more…)

Whisky Regions Of Scotland

Tuesday, June 30th, 2009
Glenfiddich
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Just as France has its wine regions, Scotland has its whisky regions. Each one produces whiskies of various qualities which, even to the novice, are noticeable in taste, colour and aroma. Every distillery in Scotland has its own story to tell and peculiar traditions, adding to the romance and mystique of Scotch whisky distilling.

A visit to a whisky distillery is an unforgettable and unique experience, and no matter where you are in Scotland there will be a distillery nearby. A trip round Scotland isn’t possible for everyone, so it helps to be informed about the characteristics of each region’s whisky, and tailor visiting distilleries to individual taste.

Lowlands

The lowland region covers the area from the border with England and from the Clyde estuary to the Tay estuary. The main feature of lowland whiskies is their dry, light flavour and colour, mainly due to the lighter lowland barley and smaller amount of peat used in the barley drying process. Although they are light, they have a sweet, almost fruity taste and make a great aperitif, perfect for the newcomer to Scotch whisky drinking. Notable lowland whiskies are Auchentoshan, Bladnoch, and Glen Kinchie. (more…)

The Story Of Scotch Whisky

Thursday, May 28th, 2009
Chairman of the Indian conglomerate UB Group, ...
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Scotland is famous for many things, but perhaps none more so than Scotch Whisky. Many have tried to recreate this famous beverage in other parts of the world, but only in Scotland can the perfect ingredients and environment be found to produce the perfect whisky. Understanding the origins, manufacturing process, and qualities of good single malt whisky adds to the pleasure of drinking this king of drinks.

History

The man credited with creating the first Scotch Whisky is Friar John Cor. It was called “aqua vitae” (“water of life”) and was by order of the King. The written record of this dates to 1494 and, although distilling was an art practiced by the Vikings and ancient Persians, this is thought to be the first time whisky was produced in Scotland. (more…)

Whisk It All Out

Tuesday, May 5th, 2009
LONDON - NOVEMBER 23:  Frances Godden of Bonha...
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Unless you’re one of the few nice people around who hasn’t even savored a drop of liquor in their whole lives, chances are that you’re at least marginally familiar of the drink whiskey. Whiskey – which is also spelled by other without the letter E – is the name used for a wide variety of delicious and distilled liquors that are produced from grains and later on aged in oak casts. Due to its grain content, a lot of people believe that whiskey is a good type of liquor to drink. In fact, there are numerous couples both in the United States and Europe who prefer to feed their babies whiskey rather than milk or water. (more…)

Some Facts About Whiskey Or Whisky

Thursday, January 29th, 2009
EDINBURGH, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 13:  Andrew ...
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When discussing whisky the first thing that needs to be know is that there are two legitimate spellings. The Scotts and Canadians spell whisky without the “e”, while the Irish and Americans spell it with an “e” as in whiskey. This should be the first indication that the world of whisky is a very complicated one and has many regional differences in taste and production. This is part of what makes whisky such an interesting and enjoyable spirit.

Historically it is believed that the Irish were the first to make whiskey, however the Scotts have also laid claim to being the first whisky producers. The Irish used the term “uisce beatha” (“Water of Life” in Gaelic) to describe whiskey, so it must have been important. (more…)

Potted Whiskey

Thursday, January 29th, 2009
Whisky Galore!
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It would be appropriate for a people-based profile of whisky to begin by naming the first whisky maker. Sadly, no-one knows who he was. In fact, no-one knows who the first distiller was. It is clear that from AD 4 onwards, alchemists in China, India, Arabia, Egypt and Greece were using distillation to make turpentine, medicines, makeup (al-kohl, our alcohol) and perfumes, but there is no evidence that they adapted brewing techniques to make whisky. (more…)

Learn About Whiskey

Thursday, January 29th, 2009
EDINBURGH, UNITED KINGDOM - MARCH 13:  Andrew ...
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In meaning, whiskey translates to “water of life”. Whiskey originated from Scotland during the early 1400’s, and is very popular around the world today. Even today, whiskey tastes much like it did when it first began. Manufacturers of whiskey are strong on heritage, and therefore do all they can to capture the flavor that whiskey has always been known for.

For any occasion, whiskey is truly great. Whiskey is commonly used during weddings and ceremonies, and both the bride and groom will drink it to signify a relationship that will stand the test of time. The drink isn’t only served with weddings, as it is also popular in bars and restaurants as well. Those wishing to signify friendship can also serve whisky as a gesture of wanting to be friends. (more…)